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Pyro, Parties and Heavy Riffs: On the Road With Greta Van Fleet

By patrickdoyle14 / Published on Thursday, 12 Jul 2018 10:48 AM / No Comments / 6 views

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

A Nashville journey with classic rock’s new hope

“It’s hilarious people call this a job,” says Sam Kiszka, the 19-year-old bassist-keyboardist of Seventies-rock revivalists Greta Van Fleet. After stunning classic-rock fans with their uncanny ability to channel Led Zeppelin on their debut EP, Greta have proved themselves a genuinely great live band, even gaining the endorsements of Robert Plant and Sir Elton John (“He told us to be more flamboyant,” says Kiszka). At a recent stop in Nashville, the band – Sam and his brothers Jake and Josh Kiszka, plus drummer Danny Wagner – barbecued, lit a cardboard cutout of a country legend on fire, and played for a few thousand fans at Marathon Music Works. It was one of the dozens of places Greta sold out this summer, and they haven’t even released their first album yet. “The bigger the crowds, the more wacky things get,” says Sam. “The energy right now is on fire.”

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